Posted by James Catone on Nov 20, 2019
Hear Ye, Hear Ye!
 
Fourteen Rotarians and three guests were dining on roast pork, potatoes, grilled vegetables, bread and salad as President Eddie gaveled the meeting to order and immediately called on Bruce for a
Since We Last Met report.  
Sarah White celebrated a birthday on November 15th. No other birthdays, wedding anniversaries or club anniversaries. On This Day in History: In 1923 Garrett Morgan patented the three-position traffic signal. Least We Forget: From The Bulletin November 20, 1925: “The Worcester, Mass. Club had 85 visiting Rotarians last Thursday, the 12th, during the New England Conference. Vermont was represented by three from Rutland, three from Montpelier and two from Barre.”
 
John, Caroline and Bruce attended District Training last weekend which included roundtable discussions on a variety of topics and Rotary Foundation Training. Caroline announced that the District Conference will be held May 1-3 at Jay Peak Resort. President Eddie announced that the Wheelock House closet is close to being finished with some minor painting remaining to be done. Caroline reported that ticket sales for the New Year’s Eve event are not going as well as expected. She suggested that if you are not attending, you could buy a ticket and sponsor two people who would like to attend. She is looking for a felt covered poker table to be used at that event.  If you have one and are willing to loan it, email me at jcatone@comcast.net.  President Eddie reminded us of no meeting on November 27th
 
A Mix of Happiness and Sadness
 
Tony gave a Sad Dollar because he has TMJ (grinds his teeth in his sleep) and there is no treatment for it. That brought dentist John to his feet and proposing a fine of Tony for violating the first question of the Four Way Test, Is it the truth? John said that were indeed treatments for it. Fine passed. Tony paid a fine which had passed on our field trip to Old Route Two Spirits. Doug gave a Happy Dollar because he was glad to be back. He gave another in recognizing Treating Children Fairly Day. John gave a Happy Dollar in celebration of his son’s 20th birthday. Caroline gave a Sad Dollar because her daughter has an infection and had to be treated at the E.R. She gave a Happy Dollar for “being here today.” Karl gave a Happy or Sad Dollar (not sure which) for losing traditions (missed the details). He gave another because Josh Magnan was in the woods for an hour and shot a 12 point buck. George gave a Happy Dollar because his wife Linda is going skiing on Friday and another in recognition of Rotary Foundation month. Guests Doug Bullett and Paul Hutchins were introduced. President Eddie gave a Happy Dollar in recognizing the Bruins emblem on Paul’s jacket.
 
Special Announcement                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                        
Caroline reminded us of the World Santa Coat/Hat event on Saturday, December 14th. Please let her know what you will be bringing for the potluck. Appetizers, snacks, drinks, cookies and sweets are particularly desirable to go with the main
course--pizza.
 
 
The Quarry Project
 
President Eddie introduced Ilene Gillander, a former theater and English teacher at Spaulding. She has always sought opportunities for students to create art. She saw a poster with ladies walking on water. She tracked it down and found that Hannah Dennison, a dancer and choreographer, creates art the touches lives and picks unusual venues for her art; hence, the Quarry Project. With that she introduced Hannah Dennison. While the presentation was mainly visual and answering questions, here is the background from their website in the words of Hannah Dennison:
The Quarry Project is a site-specific dance/theatre piece being created for the Wells Lamson quarry, one of the oldest, deepest granite quarries in the country, now flooded and in “reserve.” Previously owned by Rock of Ages and now owned by Polycor, a Quebec corporation, the quarry is in the small village of Websterville. Many residents had relatives who worked in the Wells Lamson, and many still work in the nearby active quarry.
In the spring of 2016, I began the process of securing permission to work in this extremely compelling and challenging site. During these eighteen months, while I negotiated with the corporation, I visited the site many times, alone and with several of my artistic partners.
In addition to discussions with my collaborators, initial meetings were held with a flotation expert, an engineer, an educator, Barre Town officials, and past supporters. In the areas unfamiliar to me but crucial to the permission and ultimate success of the piece, I enlisted a pro bono team of experts in the fields of law, insurance, and corporations. They guided me (and will continue to be available for the life of the project) through the tangle of rules and regulations.
During the discussion and “Q & A,” it was pointed out that the acoustics are amazing; and that the dancers are from northern and central Vermont and the Burlington area. Bob Pope opined that it changes your perspective of a quarry. He should know better than anyone in the room!
Performances are slated (pun intended) for 2020 with the audience on floating platforms. Check out their website for details and updates: www.thequarryproject2020.com.
 
 
 
 
Until next time...that's all folks...
 
 
 
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